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Kimberly Reads

personalmessageblog.blogspot.com

nevver:

What we’re reading

archive.org

Where my books go, W. B. Yeats

Where my books go, W. B. Yeats

(via bookporn)

Currently Reading: Matterhorn (2010) by Karl Marlantes

Currently Reading: Matterhorn (2010) by Karl Marlantes

nevver

nevver:

Summer reading

aseaofquotes
aseaofquotes:

Frances Hodgson Burnett, A Little Princess

aseaofquotes:

Frances Hodgson Burnett, A Little Princess

(via bibliophilefiles)

classicpenguin
classicpenguin:

2014 marks the 50th anniversary of Roald Dahl’s beloved Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
“You couldn’t accuse Willie Wonka of being reasonable: in a world of children who’ve grown up too fast, he’s an adult who has somehow managed to hang on to his childishness. He’s the opposite of what you’ve been taught to expect from a mentor: where other writer supply their child heroes with grown-ups who teach them how to become grown-ups themselves, Willia Wonka is there to remind Charlie not to grow up too far or too fast.”
—Lev Grossman, from the introduction to our Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features cover art by award-winning cartoonist Ivan Brunetti.

classicpenguin:

2014 marks the 50th anniversary of Roald Dahl’s beloved Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

You couldn’t accuse Willie Wonka of being reasonable: in a world of children who’ve grown up too fast, he’s an adult who has somehow managed to hang on to his childishness. He’s the opposite of what you’ve been taught to expect from a mentor: where other writer supply their child heroes with grown-ups who teach them how to become grown-ups themselves, Willia Wonka is there to remind Charlie not to grow up too far or too fast.”

—Lev Grossman, from the introduction to our Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition of Charlie and the Chocolate Factorywhich features cover art by award-winning cartoonist Ivan Brunetti.

fer1972

fer1972:

Bent Objects by Terry Border

Ain’t it cool?

(via englishmajorhumor)

Being lazy

Haven’t written a good post in awhile. I’ve been super busy juggling two jobs and trying to take advantage of the last bit of summer before it starts to get cold and wintry in Alaska (it’s only August, but it won’t be long!). I finished reading World War Z (which I quite enjoyed, by the way), but I haven’t had the motivation to really start a new book yet. 

Starting in September, I am also going to begin teaching English and Spanish classes to home school students for the tutoring company I work for. I did a bit of this in college, but it’s been about 4 years since I did it last, so it will be interesting to start teaching again. I’m still going to be working two jobs in the fall, but hopefully I will still find the time to put some effort in here. 

threepanelbookreview
threepanelbookreview:

JANE EYRE by Charlotte Brönte.

This is great. All of the three-panel book reviews are pretty brilliant. 

threepanelbookreview:

JANE EYRE by Charlotte Brönte.

This is great. All of the three-panel book reviews are pretty brilliant. 

benmarriott

by benmarriott:
Having fun isn’t hard when you’ve got a library card

by benmarriott:

Having fun isn’t hard when you’ve got a library card

(via bookporn)

newyorker.com
newyorker:

Read about the inspiration behind Lorenzo Mattotti’s cover this week: http://nyr.kr/1o7xutH

newyorker:

Read about the inspiration behind Lorenzo Mattotti’s cover this week: http://nyr.kr/1o7xutH

mountain-books
I like my ereader, too, though…

I like my ereader, too, though…

(via reisball)

stoicmike
stoicmike:

Having a huge number of books is not exactly about reading them all — it’s about having the possibility of reading them all. — Michael Lipsey

stoicmike:

Having a huge number of books is not exactly about reading them all — it’s about having the possibility of reading them all. — Michael Lipsey

(via bookporn)

fyspringfield

The only books we have are ones that were banned by other schools.

The only books we have are ones that were banned by other schools.

(via mudwerks)

observando
In a good bookroom you feel in some mysterious way that you are absorbing the wisdom contained in all the books through your skin, without even opening them.

Mark Twain (via observando)

(via prettybooks)